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Old 04-16-2007, 02:32 PM
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Default Schellac (French Polish Style) Vs (Lacquer Thinly Coated)

I did read all the postings on Schellac (French Polish Style) vs lacquer on page 9 or 10 but my question is different.

Schellac (French Polish Style) Vs (Lacquer Thin Coated)

I am looking to get Lacquer Thinly applied, if that makes sense. the reason for me leaning towards Lacquer is the factor of lower maintenance.

Is Schellac that much better then Lacquer and if so how much better


Dr. Pepe Vergara your input is highly valued

Thank you all, for all you input

From Howard
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Old 04-16-2007, 06:26 PM
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Default Re: Schellac (French Polish Style) Vs (Lacquer Thinly Coated

Quote:
Originally Posted by Techmanac
I did read all the postings on Schellac (French Polish Style) vs lacquer on page 9 or 10 but my question is different.

Schellac (French Polish Style) Vs (Lacquer Thin Coated)

I am looking to get Lacquer Thinly applied, if that makes sense. the reason for me leaning towards Lacquer is the factor of lower maintenance.

Is Schellac that much better then Lacquer and if so how much better


Dr. Pepe Vergara your input is highly valued

Thank you all, for all you input

From Howard
I am not a doctor, nor play one on TV!

I made three guitars with lacquer last year, but I am not using lacquer anymore. I need my health. I saw most of the guitars lacquered in Spain. It saves time and money.

French polish has my vote. Now, that I really can do a perfect job, I amnot going to quit.
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Old 04-17-2007, 12:01 AM
Mister Lovaguitara Mister Lovaguitara is offline
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Pepe - how about a really thinly applied lacquer? will is leave the soundboard as free to vibrate as french polish?

Tecmanac - you could always ask the luthier to lacquer the back and sides and french polish only the top, It's actually a quite common combination.
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Old 04-17-2007, 07:27 AM
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Lacquer is a very thin layer of nitrocellulose. I have seen perfectly sounding guitars that were finished with lacquer. So, I also recommend lacquer.
Lacquer is a terrible thing for the lungs of the person applying it, that is why I will not do it anymore.
French polish materials are: shellac (a natural non toxic resin), olive oil, and etanol (booz - 100%). What can go wrong there? You get hungry and drunk French polishing a guitar. That is the reason I like it.

I would go for whatever your luthier is more familiar with.
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Old 04-17-2007, 08:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepe Vergara
Mr. Pepe Vergara
Thank you for your input for it makes me more relax feeling.

However stand by for more questions....
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Old 04-17-2007, 08:53 AM
Chiptheshrink Chiptheshrink is offline
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I like to French Polish my instruments for the same reasons as Pepe (and I keep juice in the fridge as a mixer for the Everclear). Lacquer is terrible, toxic stuff. But I also have a nice Lorenzo Pimentel concert guitar that has a perfectly applied and really thin coat of lacquer, and it sounds great. It also doesn't have that 'glow" that a nice French polish has, but I don't worry about arm sweat or being nearly as careful with it.

I think that the problem often arises that it is easier to cover imperfections and small problems with a thick coat of lacquer, but if done well, it avoids many of those problems. If I wanted to do a job that just looks good, though, and I was less worried about the sound, I can gun it on thicker and then buff the heck out of it. Then it will look fine, but kill the sound.

Maybe I'm just slow, though, but if I really want to do a great job with nitrocellulose, it takes me about the same amount of time as French polishing. With lacquer I have to seal and fill and burlap off the filling and sand again and shoot coat after coat and wet sand in between and wet sand afterward and buff and polish, and all that is to smooth a layer of plastic. If I'm doing all that, I might as well use a little pumice and elbow grease and French polish. And while I don't have to be as careful with my Pimentel (which I love), it will always seem at least a teeny bit "off" to me because of the lacquer on a guitar of that quality (even though I am 99.9999% sure that I couldn't tell the difference in sound).

Anyhow, although I am more than willing to own a lacquered guitar for everyday use, maybe the lacquered body and French polished top is the way to go as a compromise. But for me the bottom line is that French polish just seems "right" for a classical guitar, and I choose to believe that Everclear and orange juice is still better for my liver than lacquer fumes...
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Old 04-18-2007, 07:36 PM
Marcus Dominelli Marcus Dominelli is offline
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Hi Techmanac, and everyone else!
I avoid doing lacquer at all costs, but it was not always this way. In the past I sprayed lacquer a lot, so I am pretty familiar with the process.
In my opinion, a thin laquer finish will not kill the sound of the guitar. I just did a big blurb on this topic on the del camp forum so I won't go over it all again now. But the long and short of it is this:
A "thin" nitro lacquer finish is about .004"inch or 1/10th of a m.m. A skilled luthier who is really good at spraying might be able to bring this down a hair, but at this point, I don't think anyone can measure the difference very accurately.
A thick french polish is only about .002" inch thick.(1/2 of a thin lacquer finish). This is a really nice looking french polish with a high gloss, that does not look 'matte' or pebbly to the eye. One of those lousy looking french polish jobs is even thinner!!!
So a really good french polished finish is half the weight (assuming the densities of the two materials are the same).
It's true the french polish is not as durable, but it is a lot easier to touch-up. And it looks a lot nicer.
But I can see your dilemna. French polished guitars do not work for everyone.
Perhaps you could get the back and sides done with an oil varnish or a water based laquer from a luthier who does not like lacquer fumes. The top could still be french polished for optimum sound quality.
Good luck!
Marcus Dominelli
Dominelli Guitars
Victoria, B.C.
Canada
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Old 04-18-2007, 07:49 PM
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Default Marcus Dominelli & Pepe Vergara

If i do go oil for the body how about the neck and the top i wanna now go french because of you Marcus & Pepe

How ever Marcus can you please embellish on this subject a little more


thank you


From Howard
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Old 04-18-2007, 08:51 PM
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Default Re: Marcus Dominelli & Pepe Vergara

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..... If i do go oil for the body how about the neck and the top i wanna now go french because of you Marcus & Pepe ....

From Howard
I like "boiled linseed oil" (Tru oil?). it is a very easy finish to apply. It does not protect as much as lacquer, but it looks fine. My first guitar finished with oil looked very nice. My first guitar finished with FP looked horrible. The tru-oil is really a varnish (linseed oil takes a long time to dry --remember the oil paintings?-- or the piano finish) made adding some cobalt based dryers at certain temperature).
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Old 04-18-2007, 09:09 PM
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Default Pepe

Thank you for your time in all your answers for it really means the world to me
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