Sep
26

Fuller

We have photos of the next guitar on its way to us from English luthier Jake Fuller. The woods used for this guitar have a great story, which Jake tells us in his own words:

“The old spruce is from a violin wedge some I got from a cello maker. The guitars has a four piece top and a three-piece English cherry back. Sounded good from the first strum.

“I was offered a few pieces of this spruce by the violin maker, who was given them by a retired cello/violin maker (now deceased). You can tell it’s old when you work it. The best way to describe it is fossilized. This guitar was made from one of the best wedges. You can see the darkening of the wood at the ends from years of being stored. It must be over 50 years old at least to get to this state. The old spruce wood seems to give the guitars a played-in feel from the beginning.

“The English Cherry came from a local wood dealer who specialises in indigenous hardwoods. It came from a large pile of reclaimed floor boards. It’s one of my favourite woods for the back and sides. Firstly, it’s satisfying to use wood from my country. It’s a wood of medium density, sitting between cypress and rosewood, similar to maple. Unlike maple, which has a dullish tap tone, it has a nice clear ring to it, more like a rosewood. Subsequently it gives the guitar a wider range of qualities, from the warmth of maple, to the presence of rosewood. It also has a wonderful colour with a subtle figure.”

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