Jan
17

We are always happy campers when Ukranian-born / Austrialian-based classical guitar phenom Alex Tsiboulski drops by the GSI showroom! In addition to his brilliantly expressive playing, Alex’s repertoire is always a refreshing mix of traditional along with a little something new, often from Brazilian composer and guitarist Chrystian Dozza.

This week, we have four performances from Alex to share with you. First, you will hear Barrios’ pleasing Vals Op. 8 No. 4 on a 2018 Dominik Wurth. This is followed with a composition by Dozza based off a theme by the great Brazilian composer Egberto Gismonti played on a 1990 John Gilbert. Third comes from another contemporary composer Dusan Bogdanovic with his “African Sketches” on a 2018 Ross Gutmeier. And finally, the set is finished off with another energetic composition from Dozza, “Baiao de Dois.” Enjoy Alex’s playing and the wonderful sound of all these guitars!

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12 Responses to “Alex Tsiboulski plays Wurth, Gutmeier, and Gilbert”

 
  1. Jesse Vernier says:

    I hope the world discovers who and what you are Alex. I will help if I can.

  2. Dave Blakey says:

    Alex plays very well.
    I Prefer the Gilbert. Although I knew John I can say this without bias.

  3. Rob Rushing says:

    I had some initial doubts with the first few measures of the Barrios — those doubts were easily dispatched by the rest, however! Dozza’s “Gismonti” is fantastic, and I’ll be looking for sheet music to that next. Altogether really excellent playing. The recording is a bit noisy, but Tsiboulski has great control of tone.

    • Jesse Vernier says:

      Rob, the Vals was played soiree style, with operatic staging considerations….. only a great communicator would do that ….

      Dave, I spent some time in JG’s shop. He was making me some tuners. His sons first guitar was up and headed for David Russel…..and he had the Tannenbaum there too, just returned……. fun guitar, a bit arid with his peg bridge piece…too much separation isn’t always the ticket…..he was truly a gifted innovator…

  4. Herman says:

    Sorry, but I couldn’t watch because the body language is too distracting! The stage presence or lack there of, plays an important role in performance!

  5. Ivan says:

    Hmm, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and we all are affected differently by certain things, but just throwing in my two cents, I did not find Alex’s body language distracting. On the contrary, I found it quite remarkable that Alex could have such a great control of his playing that he was able to abandon himself completely to the feelings he had for the music and, as his hands played, allow the rest of his body to freely dance to the music he was making.
    And if there is anything distracting about it, one can close his or her eyes and just listen. That alone is a very satisfying experience, courtesy of Alex’s hard work and talent.

  6. John says:

    Below is a copy of my comments on YouTube.

    The recording is extremely bass heavy….I seriously doubt that this guitar sounds like this in reality. Also, his performance is way too theatrical. If he put half as much effort into actually producing sounds, rather than swooning around and pretending to be transported by the music , he’d be much better off. He is obviously a talented player, but a bit too ‘up himself’ for my taste.

  7. Michael says:

    The sound is indeed very „fat“, almost unnatural.
    But -i like it! Is this recorded in mono? Could you describe the equipment used?

  8. Dr. Arturo F. Jasso says:

    he plays well. All the facial gestures and the swinging of his head do not add anything to the music.

  9. David Blanchard says:

    As Ivan says, he obviously enjoys the music and plays as if his body is an extension of the guitar. I remember seeing Julian Bream in the late 1960’s in SF as a teenager. His body language was also expressive as well as having actively tapping feet. Didn’t detract from the experience. Similarly, but more dramatically, Glenn Gould played Bach with such intensity that you can hear his breathing on the old recordings. Anyway, a nice rendition of the Barrios and other pieces.