You searched for: jose ramirez

Jan
22

Our new GSI Auction platform is now live, and first up is a 1976 José Ramírez “2a” with a gorgeous cedar top and Indian rosewood back and sides.

Continue Reading

Jan
13

BACKGROUND

This guitar was donated to our non-profit charitable organization, the GSI Foundation. Guitar sales through the GSI Foundation raise money to directly benefit music education in public schools. Feel free to contact us for more information.

DESCRIPTION

This instrument was built in 1976 in the famous Jose Ramirez III workshop, which for over half a century has produced instruments performed on by countless professionals from Sting to Segovia, Chet Atkins to Sabicas and Lee Ritenour to Christopher Parkening. The “2a” models are pretty much identical to the standard “1a” in all ways, the Ramirez shop claimed back in the day that the lower price tag was due to either using materials that may have minor aesthetic blemishes, such as small knots, or what in Spain are called “cocas” (darker areas of resin concentration in the grain), or if they were built by an apprentice and not a foreman. However, after many decades of discussion, many players and aficionados have concluded that a great 2a can be identical to a great 1a. This guitar has some well repaired cracks including one crack the length of the back, as well as one in the top. It has also been fitted out with sound ports (similar to Robert Ruck) on the ribs, either side of the neck. All repairs are perfectly stable and the guitar plays and sounds great, exactly like a classic Ramirez right from this period should – that famous tone that is thick yet clear, having that essential warm, mysterious and moody quality that made Ramirez famous. An excellent players guitar, this one also boasts a standard nut width at 52mm, rather than the usual 54mm that some players find a bit difficult. Simply put, easy to play and great sounding.

For more information on Ramirez, be sure to read The Ramirez Family: Masters of the Guitar, or for information on the Ramirez family members, from Amalia Ramirez back to Jose I and for some interesting fact-checking on myths and facts about this legendary workshop.

May
19

tennant

As you can imagine, over the years we’ve recorded more than a few great videos on guitars by Jose Ramirez – everything from brand new guitars to guitars from the middle of the last century and of course the 1969 Ramirez that was owned on played by Andres Segovia for ten years. Players have included Scott Tennant, Adam Holzman, Irina Kulikova, George Sakellariou, Tavi Jinariu and many more. We’ve complied a playlist of all of the videos we’ve produced featuring Jose Ramirez guitars and you can see them all here, or simply watch the video below and you’ll be on your way.

Continue Reading

Jul
21

segoviaramirez

Only the most rare and highly-reputed guitars from across eras of the past receive great attention to the extent that players, recording artists and collectors share a common language in expressing just how valuable a guitar is – not in a monetary sense, but in the way that particular guitar’s presence fills the room, in the way its presence inspires a player and in the way the character of the guitar is simply like none other encountered before. Such guitars that come to mind are very special in our books, for example: the famous Antonio de Torres “La leona” (see Fritz Ober’s replica), the 1927 Francisco Simplicio SP/CSAR and the 1957 Hermann Hauser II (ex. Julian Bream) to name very few. However, one very special guitar made an appearance in our showroom recently amongst a legendary, rare and astonishing collection, and it has received attention in ways we could not have imagined.

Continue Reading

Jan
18

Taso_Rumores_03

Here’s Taso Comanescu playing two classic pieces on guitars from Manuel and Jose Ramirez.
Rumores de la Caleta by Isaac Albeniz is played on a c. 1912 Manuel Ramirez and Tarrega’s Capricho Arabe on a 1967 Jose Ramirez ‘AM’.

Continue Reading

Aug
21

joseramirezdynasty

Very few names have been as influential in the development and history of the guitar as the name José Ramírez. The family tradition was born around the year 1870, when a 12 year-old boy began an apprenticeship at a local builder’s workshop. He worked to develop his skills and in 1882 he founded the José Ramírez workshop. Now in its fourth generation, with Amalia Ramírez carrying on the legacy, the Ramírez name continues to be the gold standard by which all other Spanish classical and flamenco guitars are measured.

Here, we have compiled a brief but robustly informative history of the José Ramírez dynasty, which so grandly continues to impress historians, audiences and players alike for its output of guitars that capture the Spanish tradition and soul. To go more in-depth into each generation’s special contributions to the guitar and the famous workshop, click on each individual.

Continue Reading

Aug
20

jose4


Current Inventory     |     Past Inventory


José Enrique Ramírez García (José IV; 1953 – 2000) was born in Madrid during May 1953. He started working as an apprentice in 1971 and reached the category of journeymen in 1977. In 1988, he decided to run the family business with his sister Amalia Ramírez. His idea was to re-define the models that were being built then.

In the mid 80s, a change had been detected in the taste in sound of some major guitarists, and the Ramírez family began to make their guitars exactly what these players needed.

Continue Reading

Aug
19

Current Inventory     |     Past Inventory


jose2

José Simón Ramírez de Galarreta y Pernias (José II; 1885 – 1957) was born in 1885. He grew up in his father’s shop, where he not only learned the trade from his father, but from journeymen like his uncle Manuel and other legendary luthiers like Enrique García and Julián Gómez. Besides being a guitar-maker, he was a guitarist, and when he was 20 years old, he was hired to go on a two-year tour of South America.

Continue Reading

Apr
11

jose3(2)


 Current Inventory     |     Past Inventory


José Ramírez III (1922 – 1995) was without doubt one of the most influential and important luthiers in the second part of the 20th century. His guitars influenced hundreds of instrument makers, many of whom imitated him, and thousands of guitarists around who played his instruments. Indirectly, he even influenced composers of the guitar who found for the first time that their music could be heard in large concert halls instead of small chamber music environments. It could be argued that José III had a more profound effect on the development of the modern guitar than any other guitar maker in history.

So what was his secret, and why do we make such sweeping claims about his importance? One paramount reason is that José III was the first and only luthier to be able to standardize the process of making a classical guitar such that it could be built by any well-trained artisan, according to his precise plan and under his supervision. Moreover, the design was such that these instruments, although not made by him personally, stood up to and often exceeded the quality of the best handmade instruments of the day.

Continue Reading

Apr
11

jose1


Current Inventory     |     Past Inventory


The guitars of José Ramírez I (1858-1923) look backwards, but the workshop he established was to dominate Spanish guitar-making to the present day.

Continue Reading